Shiny Shelf


Angel: Tomorrow

By Mark Clapham on 02 July 2002

WARNING! Contains spoilers!

For little Annie, Tomorrow was only a day away. For Angel fans, it means the torment of six months waiting for a resolution to a huge cliffhanger. It really is a hard knock life.

Anyone expecting closure at the end of this season will have been disappointed, but those of us who like to be moved, shaken and finally left teetering on the edge of our seats were well catered for. The main arc of this season has been the centuries-long feud between Angel and Holtz. Angel can never repair the damage he did by killing Holtz’s family, and he knows it – Holtz is a whole load of bad karma that’s going to get paid off, one way or another.

Not that our heroes are aware of the storm ahead. The beauty of this episode, written and directed by outgoing show-runner David Greenwalt, is that the gang at Angel Investigations think everything is just peachy. Unlike us, they don’t know the hideous truth of Holtz’s final revenge, the payback for the family he lost. As secondary characters depart the hotel for other cities – and other dimensions – it’s hard not to think of rats leaving the ship just before it hits an iceberg.

That the finale is even bleaker than this reviewer’s building fears would suggest is nothing short of a remarkable feat of sadistic imagination. Yes, folks, it’s absolutely horrible – if we didn’t know that season four was on it’s way, this would be a fantastically grim ending to Angel’s story, the sins of the past coming back to bite him, big time. Grim for him – good news for viewers who like to be hit with a few shocks now and again.

The episode isn’t perfect. Like so much Angel, while certain plotlines seem meticulously pre-planned others appear to have been made up on the spot. Then there’s the matter of a pivotal sequence which, although emotionally performed and impressive in its implications, is executed with such high levels of cheese as to give the audience a late night case of indigestion.

Small flaws aside though, in a vintage year for season finales this is one of the best, leaving us hanging on a haunting final image. Not bad for a spin-off, huh?


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By Mark Clapham

Mark Clapham is a Devon-based writer and editor. You can find out more about him at the egotistically named markclapham.com.




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