Shiny Shelf


Grimm Up North 2010: Dead Hooker In A Trunk

By Sarah Jane Vespertine on 11 November 2010

How¬† can anyone resist a film with the title ‘Dead Hooker in a Trunk’? I certainly couldn’t, and am very pleased I gave in to temptation.

This is the first full length feature from the Soska Sisters, identical twins Jen and Sylvia, who also star, along with a small cast who fulfill many of the production roles. A guest appearance from Carlos Gallardo (‘El Mariachi’) shows that they have learned well from the Robert Rodriguez school of guerrilla film-making.

An almost dialogue-free, if slightly stagy, introduction sets up the characters, all of whom remain nameless throughout. In the credits they are the two twins, Badass and Geek, Badasses’ best girl friend, Junkie, and Geek’s best (evangelical Christian) boy friend, Goody Two Shoes.

A simple trip out to collect Goody Two Shoes from his church youth group turns into a nightmarish and yet very funny day from hell when they notice an odd smell coming from the boot of their car. Unlikely as it may seem, it turns out someone has left a dead hooker in there. Don’t you just hate when that happens?

They can’t go to the police as it turns out that Badass and Junkie can’t actually remember how they spent the previous night, and so, after some debate, they decide instead to simply bury the dead hooker in the woods. On the way, they stop off at Junkie’s ex-boyfriend’s flat, and from this point on, there is the most marvellous, unrestrained carnage. People are shot, stabbed, beaten to death, limbs are severed, and all variety of unlikely weapons are used. I think it was after the beautifully random arm-severing that I decided I really loved this film.

The plot, such as it is, wanders around a little in places, but with such wonderful set-pieces that you never mind for a moment. It is frequently laugh-out-loud funny, occasionally wincingly violent, and consistently entertaining in a frankly insanely pleasing way. Some scenes won spontaneous applause from the audience, and the cast are obviously loving every minute of it.

The relationships and interaction between the mis-matched main characters are a delight, and it’s very pleasing that for all their arguing and fighting, you know they are all really good friends. They repair each others’ awful injuries, soothe each others’ traumas, and bond over the most ridiculously dreadful events that you can imagine.

Bizarre, wild and utterly mad, this was a stand out film for me. I really hope it gets the distribution and cult status that it deserves, as the Soska sisters can certainly teach a lot of more successful film makers a thing or two about how to entertain an audience.


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By Sarah Jane Vespertine

Sarah Jane Vespertine is a writer, occasional poet and freelance thinker. You can follow her on Twitter at twitter.com/essers.




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